First, some good news: Breast cancer death rates have been dropping, likely thanks to earlier diagnosis and better treatment.

However, the disease remains the most common cancer among women in the U.S. and the second leading cause of cancer death in women. This year in the U.S. alone, there will be more than 230,000 new cases and nearly 40,000 deaths from invasive breast cancer.

Advancing the state of medical imaging is key to better diagnosis. And FujiFilm, one of our partners, is literally adding a new dimension to breast cancer screening using NVIDIA Quadro graphics.

Traditional 2D mammograms can produce X-ray images that are difficult for radiologists to assess due to varying breast thickness and obscured or overlapping features of tissue.

FujiFilm has pioneered a new approach to mammography that allows radiologists to more easily see through this noise and detect tissue abnormalities. The company’s Amulet mammography system captures two X-ray images of breast tissue at a time, with a few degrees separation.

FujiFilm Amulet mammography system
FujiFilm’s Amulet system gives radiologists a stereoscopic 3D view to aid diagnosis.

An NVIDIA Quadro K2000D then generates a single stereoscopic 3D image based on the two perspectives. The high-powered processor makes quick work of the data, allowing radiologists to quickly navigate through the ultra-high-resolution imagery.

With the ability to examine the tissue in stereoscopic 3D, radiologists can better differentiate physical features and get more accurate insights into patient physiology.

As a result, hundreds of thousands of mammogram readings each year can be improved thanks to a more accurate visualization process.

NVIDIA Quadro graphics are a good fit for hospitals and clinics, too, because they are designed to be incredibly reliable and simple to qualify and deploy.

Learn more about the FujiFilm Amulet system and NVIDIA Quadro GPUs at http://ow.ly/pQviK.

 

  • http://www.facebook.com/Guzzover Gustavo Del Toro

    I use Windows XP, and I’m proud of it.