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The just-published Green500 list of the world’s most energy-efficient supercomputers shows that the top 10 systems are all powered by NVIDIA Tesla GPUs.

The only other architecture ever to have cleanly swept the 10 top spots on the list is IBM’s legendary BlueGene system.

Crowned the greenest supercomputer, the Tsubame-KFC system at the Tokyo Institute of Technology, hit a record 4.5 gigaflops per watt. That’s about 25 percent more efficient than the list’s number-two, Cambridge University’s Wilkes, at 3.6 gigaflops per watt. In third place was the system at Japan’s Center for Computational Sciences, at the University of Tsukuba, at 3.5 gigaflops per watt.

Tokyo Institute of Technology’s Satoshi Matsuoka (center) receives the Green500 prize for Tsubame-KFC, the world’s most efficient supercomputer. He’s flanked by NVIDIA’s Sumit Gupta (right) GM of Tesla Accelerated Computing, and  Wu-chun Feng, organizer of the Green500 and Associate Professor of Computer Science at Virginia Tech.
Tokyo Institute of Technology’s Satoshi Matsuoka (center) receives the Green500 prize for Tsubame-KFC, the world’s most efficient supercomputer. He’s flanked by NVIDIA’s Sumit Gupta (right), GM of Tesla Accelerated Computing, and Wu-chun Feng, organizer of the Green500 and Associate Professor of Computer Science at Virginia Tech.

NVIDIA’s presence at the top of the Green500 is in the ascendant. Just six months ago, only two of the top 10 systems were accelerated by our GPUs.

At the heart of this trend is the spread of NVIDIA Tesla GPU accelerators based on our Kepler architecture. Launched last year, they are three times more energy efficient than the Fermi-based family of processors they succeeded.

Efficiency has, obviously, become an increasingly key consideration for supercomputing systems as they’ve gotten faster. The largest supercomputers can consume megawatts of power, pushing their annual energy costs into the tens of millions of dollars.

Improving energy efficiency is central to achieving exascale computing – that is, delivering supercomputers that run 50 times faster than today’s best – at a speed of 1 exaflops, or a million trillion flops.

For that, we’ll need a tenfold increase in efficiency – with systems running at 50 gigaflops per watt, according to an SC13 talk by the University of Tennessee’s Jack Dongarra, at NVIDIA’s GPU Technology Theater today.

That may, on its face, sound challenging. But bear in mind that the new Green500 list shows that we’ve achieved a better than tenfold gain in efficiency since the November 2007 list, when the top system, at England’s Daresbury Laboratory, was running at only 0.3 gigaflops a watt.

Green500Top10
Clean sweep: The ten fastest systems on the Green500 list of most efficient supercomputers include our Tesla accelerators.
  • Maxwell

    Wow that is an incredible achievement. Very well done. Congratulations!

  • Sarah Pedersen

    When I read this article I could not believe it. You actually achieved to power the top ten greenest supercomputers with your graphics cards. That is no small feat to achieve and it shows your dedication towards protecting the enviroment. My sincere congratulations and keep up this amazing work, Nvidia.

  • Sumit Gupta

    This is all due to the Kepler architecture in our new GPUs. Super energy efficient. We use the same architecture in supercomputers and in phones!

  • Appstar Financial

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  • Theo Valich

    Technically speaking, you *will* use the same architecture once the next-gen Tegra launches (soon? :) ). BTW, snazzy scarf – a strong fashion statement. :)

  • Simon Leinen

    So the trick to win this is to use the slowest/least power-hungry Xeon variant in addition to the Kepler boards… right?

  • Sumit Gupta

    Yes, Kepler is low power enough, that we can use the same GPU in our next generation Tegra mobile SoCs.

    On scarf: you should have come to Supercomputing; we gave it out at our booth.

  • Sumit Gupta

    The folks that compete to get on Green500 run several experiments to find the point where they get the maximum performance at the lowest power. The KFC experiments are detailed here: http://www.el.gsic.titech.ac.jp/~endo/kfc-slides-sc13booth.pdf

  • Theo Valich

    I’d wish if I could come, but I had to take couple of months ‘off’ the conference trek and set up the operations in my businesses. Happy spending the past month in S’pore. :) See you in early 2014.

  • Paul Margettas

    Funny how just a few years ago Nvidia was on the other side of the fence with crazy temps and power hungry. Now, ATI/AMD are those guys!

  • Jailton BC

    muito boa Nvidia

  • Sheldon Stocks

    WOW,IT’s could not believe it,I believe he can save a lot of energy to the world , this is the future trend , thanks to NVIDIA research team, I would have been concerned about NVIDIA GPUs.

    http://fut14coinsbuy.co.uk/